Posted by: the3rdi | November 10, 2010

WOMEN & DEVELOPMENT IN CONFLICT ZONES

WOMEN & DEVELOPMENT IN CONFLICT ZONES Followed by a NETWORKING RECEPTION IN PARLIAMENT

Chaired by Baroness Morris of Bolton, WiPP Co-chairman

Panel

Rahima Housaini, UNODG, Kabul, Afghanistan
Amelia B. Kyazze – Save the Children
Sheila Elliott, Business Services Support (Micro Finance)

Living and working in countries with developing economies and emerging democracies can be quite challenging at the best of times. Poor transport infrastructure, erratic power supplies, and sometimes water and food shortages, mean the pace of the development project can be slower than we planned. Imagine then, adding conflict to the situation. How can the projects make progress? Can they even get off the ground?

Where do women fit in? Does their inclusion speed things up, or slow things down? Do women working in development face additional challenges because of their gender? If so, what strategies can they use to overcome the barriers?

Come and hear from three remarkable women working in development – and in countries either post, or currently in, conflict.

Rahima has been working through Government structures in Afghanistan helping neglected and abused children, and with female prisoners. Not only working in a country at war, but in a culture where women have little voice.

Amelia is Head of Conflict & Humanitarian Policy at Save the Children. Working in relief, development and child rights, Save the Children must negotiate difficult contexts where governments may be unable or unwilling to provide assistance and protection.

And Sheila, takes a private sector approach. Having left war torn Sierra Leone in the 1990s, she set up a micro finance business to enable women to support themselves and their families.

In each of their different ways, these women are working towards the development of economies that include and empower women.

There is no charge for attending this event but for security reasons (and catering)

Please register at http://www.womeninpublicpolicy.org

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: